menu

Frequently Asked Questions

Once every 6 months is good for most people, but some people with special conditions may need to see their dentist more often. Schedule an appointment to find out what’s best for you.
Although teeth whitening seems relatively new, whitening agents have been used in dentistry for many years. They are usually peroxide based, and can be very successful when used as directed. Some patients with nerve exposure notice sensitivity, but this can be managed by our dental team’s expertise. Don’t wait for that beautiful smile any longer.
Decay is the destruction of tooth structure. Decay occurs when plaque, the sticky substance that forms on teeth, combines with the sugars and / or starches of the foods that we eat. This combination produces acids that attack tooth enamel. The best way to prevent tooth decay is by brushing twice a day and flossing daily.
This is a warning sign that gum disease is present and needs to be treated by a dental hygienist. Gum disease is what leads to tooth loss and failure of dental treatment. This frequently occurs in the absence of pain, making it an important first symptom in detecting the disease.
It is never too early to get a child acquainted with their dental team. Most children have some teeth by age one and most of their teeth by age two. Decay can start within months of eruption and accidents can occur anytime. It is recommended that children start coming to the dentist between age one and two for a chair ride and an oral exam.
Removing food and plaque from the teeth and gums should be done routinely as the first tooth erupts; however a cloth or soft-bristled toothbrush dampened with water is only necessary in the early stages. As your child gets older he or she can use a “training toothpaste” that is non-fluoridated up to age 3. At or around the third birthday, your child should transition to fluoridated toothpaste that is flavored especially for children when they are able to expectorate. Try to avoid minty flavors which can be perceived as “too spicy” or “burning” to your child’s tongue. When applying the toothpaste, only the bristles should be coated thinly; unlike the large, swooping ribbon of paste that is shown on commercials.
Removing food and plaque from the teeth and gums should be done routinely as the first tooth erupts; however a cloth or soft-bristled toothbrush dampened with water is only necessary in the early stages. As your child gets older he or she can use a “training toothpaste” that is non-fluoridated up to age 3. At or around the third birthday, your child should transition to fluoridated toothpaste that is flavored especially for children when they are able to expectorate. Try to avoid minty flavors which can be perceived as “too spicy” or “burning” to your child’s tongue. When applying the toothpaste, only the bristles should be coated thinly; unlike the large, swooping ribbon of paste that is shown on commercials.
An adult should use a fluoridated toothpaste that is the size of a small green pea; unlike the large, swooping ribbon of paste that is shown on commercials. Most toothpastes are abrasive and too much may cause tooth sensitivity.
Every 3 months or sooner if the bristles become worn and frayed. If you’ve been sick with a cold or other bacterial infection, it’s wise to replace your toothbrush once you’re better.
Between 5 and 7 years. Just like natural teeth, dentures wear down and stain with age. Your mouth is constantly changing. To make sure your dentures fit properly, they will need adjustments from time to time. We suggest seeing your dentist yearly for a denture check-up. You should always notify your dentist at the first sign of irritation, no matter how minor it may seem. Your health and comfort are important.
Dentures may feel strange at first. They may seem too big, and you may notice an increase in saliva. This is normal. Once your facial muscles and oral tissues adapt, your dentures should feel very comfortable. Some people adjust to dentures in a week, while others take a little longer.
Yes. Absolutely. Please let us know ahead of time if you would like us to make any special arrangements for you.
You'll hear the term "comprehensive care" often at Viva Dental. It means that your dentist will examine your entire mouth to evaluate your overall oral health, and recommend treatment for long-lasting good health, rather than just fixing your immediate problem.